• Why Is It So Difficult to Clean Blood from Carpet?

    As a porous material, carpet is challenging to keep clean under the best of circumstances. And if carpet is present at a bloody crime site in Orlando, it’s impossible to sanitize it properly. One of the reasons why blood cleanup is so difficult is that it usually has time to settle into the carpet before it’s cleaned. If someone suffers a serious accident in the home or a violent crime occurs, cleaning a carpet stain is not a priority—and it might even be considered obstruction of justice if evidence of a crime is destroyed. This gives the blood plenty of time to thoroughly soak the carpet fibers, carpet padding, and matting. In substantial amounts, blood can even saturate the subfloor .

    This means that even if you can remove blood stains from the fibers, the floor will still harbor blood. Blood cleanup can be a dangerous task that is best left to professional cleaning companies. It can contain pathogens that may cause infectious diseases, including HIV and hepatitis. Professional cleaners protect themselves with specialized gear as they remove the affected carpet, padding, and subfloor, and restore the area to its original condition.

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  • Get the Facts About Traumatic Amputations

    Some amputations are planned, such as when a patient with diabetes must lose a foot due to an incurable infection. Others happen suddenly and unintentionally, such as in an industrial, construction, or car accident. The aftermath of a serious accident is chaotic and messy. A survivor’s first priorities are to call 911, and apply direct pressure to the wound. The trauma scene cleanup professionals in Orlando can sanitize the site, but the paramedics will take the amputated body part to the hospital. It might be possible for it to be reattached.

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    What to Do with a Severed Body Part

    Severed digits and limbs may be rinsed with clean water if available, but should not be scrubbed. The body part should be wrapped in sterile gauze or the cleanest cloth available at the accident scene or crime site. It should then be placed into a sealable plastic bag or other waterproof container, and then placed on ice. Do not allow the amputated body part to come into direct contact with ice, and do not cover it with ice.

    When Replantation Is Possible

    A body part’s ischemia tolerance is the length of time it may still be viable despite lacking blood circulation. The ischemia tolerance of digits is about eight hours, and for limbs, it’s four to six hours. However, replantation should be attempted as soon as possible if the patient is a good candidate for it. Trauma surgeons are more likely to attempt replantation if any of the following criteria apply:

    • The amputation was a clean cut, rather than a crush injury
    • The body part was well-preserved
    • The loss of the body part will result in significant disability
    • The patient is otherwise in reasonable health, and can comply with recovery requirements
    • The patient is a child
    • The limb is an arm, rather than a leg

    In almost every case, surgeons will attempt replantation on a child, even if success isn’t likely. Surgeons are more likely to attempt to replant thumbs, rather than fingers, because prosthetic thumbs are relatively inadequate. Replantation is more likely with an upper body part, as prosthetics for feet and legs often provide better function than a replanted foot or leg.

    How Replantation Is Attempted

    When an accident survivor is a good candidate for a replantation attempt , the surgical team will begin by examining X-rays to plan the operation, administering antibiotics and a tetanus vaccine, and scrutinizing the integrity of the severed blood vessels. Then, the surgeon will reattach the following, in order: bones, tendons, nerves, arteries, and veins.

  • Hope After Hoarding: How Families Can Move Forward

    Hoarding is a clinically recognized, treatable mental health disorder. Much like substance abuse, it affects the entire family—not just the hoarder. Families of hoarders, especially children of hoarders, are more likely to be socially maladjusted, to suffer acute injuries and chronic health problems, and to experience severe familial strain. When it’s time to intervene in hoarding behaviors, calling in bio-clean experts is actually not the first step you should take. Biohazard specialists in Orlando will take care of the home, but first, your loved one needs psychological care.

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    Avoiding Hoarding-Related Mistakes

    One of the biggest mistakes families of hoarders make is trying to clear out all of the clutter all at once, without the permission of the hoarder. This causes severe emotional distress, won’t treat the mental health disorder, and will damage family relationships. Another common mistake is inadvertently enabling hoarding behavior. Don’t offer to store some items at your home or help move items to a storage unit—it will only worsen the problem. Don’t invite the hoarder to shop with you, and don’t buy tangible items for birthdays and holidays. Instead, give experiences, like restaurant gift cards (not gift cards to retail stores) or a gift certificate for a pedicure.

    Getting Help for Hoarding

    It isn’t possible to force someone to see a mental health counselor. However, you can visit one yourself. Discuss the problem and ask for solutions. The hoarder may be willing to briefly meet with the counselor outside the home, but it can take a while to build a trusting relationship between the counselor and the hoarder.

    Starting the Cleaning Process

    The homes of longtime hoarders are typically health hazards. Don’t try to clean it yourself, as you can be exposed to the following:

    • Toxic mold
    • Animal waste
    • Rodent/cockroach infestations
    • Structurally unsafe floors
    • Trip and fall injuries

    Instead, hire a biohazard cleaning company that can get the job done safely. Depending on your loved one’s progress with the treatment, you might need to have the cleaners work on just one room at a time. One massive clean-out might be too much emotional distress for your loved one to handle. Ask the mental health specialist for guidance on the best way to schedule the cleanup to minimize stress for your loved one.

  • The Aftermath of a Parent’s Suicide

    A parent’s suicide is something that haunts children for the rest of their lives. Each survivor of a parent’s suicide must find his or her own way to cope, such as by finding support resources for families affected by suicide in Orlando. Some, such as the woman featured in this video, discover that their relationship with their parent evolves after the death.

    Nancy is an author who has written about the aftermath of her mother’s suicide. As the youngest of six children, she never got to have the chance to get to know her mother well. She’s experienced rage and feelings of abandonment, but during the course of her writing project about her mother, Nancy discovered that it’s possible to nurture a connection to someone after the death. She’s explored various writings and artifacts her mother left behind, and she’s extensively interviewed the people who knew her. In the end, Nancy has discovered that “love lasts longer than death.”