• How Home Buyers Can Find Out If Someone Died in the Home

    Following a death, cleaning companies in Orlando can do an amazing job of cleaning up the aftermath. While this is good for homeowners, home buyers concerned about deaths that may have occurred on the property may find themselves with questions. If you’re planning to purchase a house but want to know more about its history, then continue reading to discover how you can learn if someone has died in the home. obituary - death

    Ask People Who Might Know

    In many locations, homeowners are not required to disclose whether a death occurred on the property for sale. Luckily, there are several steps you can take to find out for yourself, and you can start by speaking with both the seller and the real estate agent. While this option does not force someone to inform you if a death occurred on the property, there is a good chance that you will receive an honest answer if you ask directly. If you’re willing to dig a little deeper, then you may benefit from speaking with people living in the neighboring homes to ask if they’re aware of any deaths that may have occurred on the property.

    Read the Disclosure Form

    While sellers aren’t always required to reveal any deaths that have occurred on properties they put up for sale, the disclosure of important information to potential home buyers is often mandatory. When reviewing the disclosure form, you are more likely to see issues like water or termite damage listed than you are deaths, but it’s worth reading if this is a concern of yours.

    Check Local Newspapers and Obituaries

    If you aren’t satisfied with the answers that you get by speaking with the seller or real estate agent directly, then you can access the area’s newspaper archives. Search for reports about deaths or look online for articles or obituaries that may concern the property you would like to buy. Lastly, if you feel overwhelmed by the amount of information to sort through, then consider working with a company that offers services for researching deaths that may have occurred in a home.

  • Exposed to Blood? Get Tested for HIV/AIDS

    In the aftermath of a suicide, trauma, or crime, the last thing on many people’s minds is bloodborne viruses. However, in addition to hiring bioclean and crime scene cleanup services , it’s important to get tested for HIV after coming in contact with another person’s blood during an incident. If you were recently exposed to blood at a crime scene in Orlando, then watch this video to learn about the importance of getting tested for HIV.

    Regardless of age, gender, or lifestyle, anyone can be infected with HIV. However, there are factors that increase a person’s risk of contracting HIV, such as sharing needles, having unprotected sex, or being diagnosed with or treated for tuberculosis, hepatitis, or an STD. Because HIV cannot be diagnosed through symptoms, it’s important to get tested.

  • Mistakes to Avoid When Confronting a Hoarder

    When someone you live with or care for is a hoarder, knowing how to address the subject and help resolve the problem can be tricky. If you’re planning to contact cleaners in Orlando to address a hoarding mess, then consider these tips when confronting the individual beforehand:

    First, realize that the hoarded items have great value to the person. For this reason, instead of criticizing or arguing, try to politely convey the true value of the items and how keeping them may be affecting the hoarder’s quality of life. Next, consider the benefits of working with a therapist or hoarding expert, who may be able to help the individual address the cause of his hoarding behavior. You should also take care not to hire a cleaning company or attempt to deal with the mess yourself without the hoarder’s knowledge. Instead, begin the conversation outside of the home and express your concerns. When the individual is ready, he can enroll in therapy and work with professional cleaners to restore his home.

    hoarder - home

  • A Family’s Guide to Finding Peace After a Suicide Attempt

    Unfortunately, suicide attempts are one reason why some families reach out to cleaners near Orlando for crime scene cleanup and blood stain removal . If your family is dealing with the aftermath of a suicide attempt, then read on for advice on finding peace. grief - suicide

    Understand What Emotions Are Normal

    Learning that someone they love attempted suicide can be a devastating experience for family members, and it’s common to go through emotions like shock, denial, anger, and shame after this type of event. Also, you or someone in your family may feel guilty, thinking that something could have been done to prevent the incident. However, when it comes to finding peace in these circumstances, it’s important to realize that it’s not your fault or a family member’s that the individual attempted suicide.

    Recognize What Reactions Aren’t Helpful

    The range of feelings that you and others may go through during this difficult period can seem like an emotional a roller-coaster. While this response is normal, your family can benefit from recognizing what reactions will not help themselves or the person who attempted suicide. For example, you may wish to protect yourself from going through this pain again by abandoning the individual, avoiding the facts, or pretending it never happened. Another person may criticize, lecture, or become angry with the individual. Realizing that reactions like these are unhelpful may speed the healing process for your family.

    Learn How to Offer Support

    For many people, the unhelpful responses that they exhibit stem from a lack of knowledge regarding what to say or how to behave after this type of tragedy. For this reason, finding out what you can do to support the individual who attempted suicide may help your family cope. Start by letting the person know that you are there to listen and help. Then, try to understand what he or she is going through so that you may explore solutions as a family. Finally, don’t hesitate to seek the help of a professional psychiatrist, doctor, or counselor for both the individual and your family.